Journal archives for March 2022

March 01, 2022

February 2022 Photo-observation of the Month

Congratulations to vtmonarch for winning the February 2022 Photo-observation of the Month for the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist! Their photo of an American Ermine with a Northern Short-tailed Shrew (Blarina brevicauda) received the most faves of any iNaturalist observation in Vermont during the past month.

Like the Long- tailed Weasel and its other relatives, Ermine (aka Short-tailed Weasel) is a predator. Ermine hunt voles, shrews, cottontail rabbits, rats, chipmunks and nesting birds. They will also store, or cache, extra food for later use. In summer, they also eat fruit and berries.

The changing day length initiates the color shift from brown to white fur in winter. The waning hours of daylight trigger a response in the hypothalamus, commonly referred to as the “master gland”, and cause animals to undergo many changes that help them survive the winter, including changes in coat color and thickness.


With 2,000 observations submitted by 411 observers in February, it was very competitive. Click on the image above to see and explore all of the amazing observations.[/caption]

Visit the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist where you can vote for the winner this month by clicking the ‘fave’ star on your favorite photo-observation. Make sure you get outdoors and record the biodiversity around you, then submit your discoveries and you could be a winner!

Posted on March 01, 2022 07:32 PM by kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 04, 2022

Darner Flight Watch

Did you know that Monarch Butterflies are not the only migratory insect? The Common Green Darner (Anax junius) is a large, migratory dragonfly found across much of the United States. The strong correlation between temperature and Green Darner development and migration have us wondering—how will climate change impact Green Darners?

Join VCE’s Mike Hallworth and Julia Pupko on Tuesday, March 15 at 7 PM for a discussion on Green Darner phenology, migration, and the Darner Flight Watch Mission—an attempt to better understand how climate change may be affecting this dazzling dragonfly. Register here.

While you are here, check out our Darner Flight Watch website (link here) and join our project on iNaturalist (link here)!

Posted on March 04, 2022 01:27 PM by jpupko jpupko | 2 comments | Leave a comment

March 16, 2022

Join Darner Flight Watch!

Our research has found that Common Green Darner spring migration closely follows the average daily temperature of 48° F northward. We are curious if climate change will shift their migration and arrival dates. Join our Darner Flight Watch and help us beat our predictions! It's easy and fun! WIth warm air arriving Thursday and Friday, help us beat our predictions! Visit https://val.vtecostudies.org/missions/darner-flight-watch to learn more.

Predictions and Observations
prediction map for darner migration

Posted on March 16, 2022 02:31 PM by kpmcfarland kpmcfarland | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 23, 2022

Don't Forget to Vote for the March Photo-observation Winner!

Cast your votes and be counted! You can 'fave' any observation that you like to vote for the Vermont Atlas of Life iNaturalist photo-observation of the month. Located to the right of the photographs and just below the location map is a star symbol. Click on this star and you've faved an observation. At the end of each month, we'll see which photo-observation has the most favs and crown them the monthly winner. Check out awesome observations and click the star for those that shine for you. Vote early and often!

Check out who is in the lead and see a list of all of this month's photo-observations.

Posted on March 23, 2022 12:32 PM by nsharp nsharp | 0 comments | Leave a comment

March 31, 2022

March 2022 Photo-observation of the Month


A neat row of Eastern Bluebirds huddled together on a chilly March day. © @Chelsea Carroll

Congratulations to Chelsea Carroll for winning the March 2022 Photo-observation of the Month for the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist! Her photo of almost a dozen Eastern Bluebirds perched shoulder-to-shoulder on a chilly March day received the most faves of any iNaturalist observation in Vermont during the past month.

Eastern Bluebirds, while often associated with sunny fields and meadows in summer, can remain in Vermont all winter long, when they will sometimes gather together in large flocks. These flocks are often composed of one or several family groups, and as such can tend to get quite cozy with each other! On especially cold winter nights, Eastern Bluebirds will even huddle together in tree cavities or nest boxes in groups as large as 20 individuals in order to conserve warmth. On the next cold early-spring day (if there’s any left on the horizon), keep in mind there may be a tree cavity filled with snuggling bluebirds somewhere nearby!


With 4,694 observations submitted by 475 observers in March, it was very competitive. Click on the image above to see and explore all of the amazing observations.

Visit the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist where you can vote for the winner this month by clicking the ‘fave’ star on your favorite photo-observation. Make sure you get outdoors and record the biodiversity around you, then submit your discoveries and you could be a winner!

Posted on March 31, 2022 09:07 PM by nsharp nsharp | 0 comments | Leave a comment

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